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  • Author : Darcy
  • support : 1
  • Topic : Something’s not right
2019-01-06T22:30:52+00:00
Senior Contributor

Hi @Cloud9

It is an awfully confusing time when bipolar enters our loved ones lives and things change.

 

There is a lot of grief in a diagnosis both for the patient and their loved ones and as with a lot of chronic conditions can put a strain on the most resilient of relationships. 

 

I am assuming as his in in hospital hubby is in an acute episode and as it is "early days" in relation to his diagnosis.  He may as not yet see the benefits of including you in his care. (It is well documented that appropriate carer support leads to better outcomes). 

 

Hopefully he has given his permission for you to be contacted and the treatment team are in communication with you. They should be able to provide you with information about supports available to you. Even without permission, as a caregiver, you are still entitled to generic information. If he is in a public hospital there are rules about working with caregivers, particularly if he is involuntary.

In very remote areas the Flying Doctor provides mental health services in conjunction with GP services. (https://www.flyingdoctor.org.au/what-we-do/mental-health/

 

There are online and over the phone support services available. Carers Australia offer a number of free counseling services which can be done over the phone (   http://www.carersaustralia.com.au) and I believe GROW are soon to have online meetings (https://www.grow.org.au/join-a-grow-group/). I am not sure if these will be for patients only or for carers but perhaps worth checking out. 

 

Tele consults are often used for specialist or psychology services and ramping up your own care might be helpful.  A lot of us carers do see counselor or psychologists to help us cope with the ups and downs of our loved ones and to provide psych education so we provide appropriate support.

 

Other organisations may also provide services, if you let me know what state you are in I can send you a list.

 

My husband has a BPii+ diagnosis (more depression, less mania), some of us seasoned travellers,  feel free to ask anything at all. 

 

Darcy

 

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